TOP

HONOR Blog United Kingdom
United Kingdom Blog Shooting in Bad Weather: Every Cloud has a Silver Lining
March 9, 2020

Shooting in Bad Weather: Every Cloud has a Silver Lining

Whenever I saw those picturesque landscape images, with scattered cotton-candy clouds against a blue sky, I'd always tell myself I could take that kind of photo if given the opportunity.

However, the more I shoot, the more I've come to realize that weather is far from the overriding factor influencing imaging quality. I can capture moving pictures anywhere, at any time, if I make an effort to look for the optimal composition, shooting angle, and scenery.

Given that none of us can control the weather, I've outlined some tips for photography in less-than-scenic conditions.

1. Shoot up close
If you don't want the grayish sky as the dominant background in your shot, switch to a narrower angle of view and focus in on intricate details, such as leaves, flowers, or insects. Look out for the interesting visual patterns in nature, rather than merely reproducing the ordinary, or the ubiquitous. An un-seasonable green leaf that's late to change color, surrounded by a bunch of red maple leaves…for example, is rather intriguing!

Shooting in Bad Weather: Every Cloud has a Silver Lining

Or some charming flowers whose name I'm not aware of… actually, I'm not even sure that they're flowers! Could be berries!

Shooting in Bad Weather: Every Cloud has a Silver Lining

HONOR 9X doesn't have a dedicated macro camera, but it's still capable of excellent close-up photography. The 48MP main sensor captures detail with uncompromising sharpness. The depth camera generates genuine bokeh, in a progressive manner similar to how our eyes blur peripheral things until they're out of the focus.

Shooting in Bad Weather: Every Cloud has a Silver Lining

2. Create a somber mood
Whatever emotions cloudy weather brings out in you: tranquility, solemn reflection… try to channel these thoughts through your pictures. Stay within a minimalist composition framework, i.e. use an unblemished background (the grayish sky is perfect), and avoid including too many items within the frame.

Shooting in Bad Weather: Every Cloud has a Silver Lining

3. Seek out water
Water can serve as a godsend, for just about any shooting scenario, but it's particularly effective in dreary weather. On sunny days, you may need to concern yourself with the glare created by strong sunlight against the water. But when it's cloudy, capturing reflections is a breeze.
Do remember to look up at the sky often, even when you wouldn't think there's much to see, because you never know — the clouds above you are always shifting, and there's always the potential to capture a brilliant scene that makes your day!

Shooting in Bad Weather: Every Cloud has a Silver Lining

When photographing water reflections, in case the symmetric consistency throughout the image creates a somewhat boring effect, you can find tree branches and leaves to occupy an upper corner. Rocks are suitable to take a lower corner, and it doesn't matter much if they're particularly aesthetic rocks. The contrast between the textured element and smooth water surface speaks for itself.

Shooting in Bad Weather: Every Cloud has a Silver Lining

Photography can be endless fun. Even on a gloomy day, the full power, beauty and intricacy of Mother Nature is on full display. It just takes the right camera, and a little bit of perseverance, to bring it out!